Photo by Nathan Myhrvold

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Photo by Nathan Myhrvold

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Media Coverage

13 March 2021

Snowflakes as You’ve Never Seen Them Before

This story for the NYT's Science Times describes Nathan's innovative snowflake microscopy along with other impressive work by Caltech physicist Ken Libbrecht and Canadian photographer Don Komarechka.

02 February 2021

Nathan Myhrvold on NASA’s lies, Theories of Everything, working with Hawking, and COVID lockdowns

In this 2-1/2 hour-long interview, Nathan discusses Stephen Hawking and the quest to unify general relativity with quantum mechanics, string and supersymmetry theories, and the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in physics. Plus what's happening with COVID-19 evolution, herd immunity, and vaccinations. And lighter topics like: myths about nutrition, whether a fast-changing climate might make geoengineering necessary, and ways to judge the trustworthiness of new science. Also available in video form on YouTube: https://youtu.be/YUXHLTlx9DA

28 January 2021

These Are the Highest Resolution Photos Ever Taken of Snowflakes

Photographer and scientist Nathan Myhrvold has developed a camera that captures snowflakes at a microscopic level never seen before

02 November 2020

I’m Interested in Lots of Things, and That’s Actually a Bad Strategy

University of Chicago economist and Freakonomics author Steven Levitt interviewed Nathan for the podcast People I (Mostly) Admire. Among the topics they discussed in their wide-ranging conversation: how Nathan met Bill Gates and eventually became Microsoft's first chief technology officer despite never having taken a computer science class, what it was like working with Stephen Hawking and his contributions to physics, the strategies and frustrations of being a prolific inventor, the crucial role that advanced fission power can play in combatting climate change, education of highly gifted children, and Nathan's forthcoming three-volume book on pizza.

12 August 2020

The OTHER Microsoft Guy Who Wants to Save the World

Bill Nye The Science Guy and Corey Powell interviewed Nathan in a wide-ranging conversation for the podcast Science Rules! They discussed: the asteroid that finished off the dinosaurs, Nathan's research into how some of the biggest dinos whipped their tails at supersonic speeds (probably to show off for the opposite sex), and Benjamin Franklin's seminal contribution to geoengineering. They also talked about what kind of changes we'd have to make to the U.S. electricity grid—both how it works and how it's regulated—to meet the goals goals that states have set to ramp up renewable power and to curb greenhouse gas emissions. Nathan revealed how early food critics in Italy panned pizza. And Bill asked Nathan what one subject he thinks everybody should understand a little better.

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Press Releases

16 December 2013

Study Shows Some Dinosaur Growth Rates Lower Than Previously Thought

Nathan Myhrvold cautions against drawing unsupported conclusions from dinosaur growth data

30 September 2013

Climate change: fast out of the gate, slow to the finish

A new study by Carnegie’s Ken Caldeira and Nathan Myhrvold of Intellectual Ventures concludes that about half of the warming occurs within the first 10 years after an instantaneous step increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration, but about one-quarter of the warming occurs more than a century after the step increase. Their work is published in Environmental Research Letters.

16 February 2012

Only the lowest CO2 emitting technologies can avoid a hot end-of-century

Could replacing coal-fired electricity plants with generators fueled by natural gas bring global warming to a halt in this century? What about rapid construction of massive numbers of solar or wind farms, hydroelectric dams, or nuclear reactors—or the invention of new technology for capturing the carbon dioxide produced by fossil-fueled power plants and storing it permanently underground? Nathan Myhrvold of Intellectual Ventures teamed up with Carnegie Institution’s Ken Caldeira to calculate the expected climate effects of replacing the world’s supply of electricity from coal plants with any of eight cleaner options.

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